December 12, 2017

How to Use Social Proof to Increase Sales on Every Page of Your Website (Part 2)

So, continuing our discussion on social proof, you have many more ways than just the 2 discussed in the last post on this topic.

The more social proof you can get on your website, especially if you’re a small, local, or new business, the better. You really can’t overdo it.

All your social proof works together to create a convincing case you’re the best solution for solving your customer’s problem.

Here are some additional techniques you can use:

Show Off Your Notable Media Mentions

“Media” doesn’t have to be NBC, the Washington Post, or CNN (although it certainly can be).

It can be any recognized authority in your niche. For example, if you speak or present at your local Chamber of Commerce. Or if you get quoted in the Dallas Morning News.

You can easily integrate media mentions into your homepage like this:

social media mentions

The more you have, the better. You could make this a narrow band of 10-15 mentions if you want.

How to Get Media Mentions from Big-Name Authorities

Think sources like CNN and the Washington Post would never mention you?

Oh contraire!

You can absolutely get them to mention you.

Of course, this isn’t a guarantee.

However, the website Help a Reporter Out gives you just such an opportunity. When you sign up (for free by the way), you subscribe to a few different email lists of your choosing.

Then, you get various inquiries that ask for interviews, quotes, and opinions on questions. And yes, the biggest media sources in every niche frequently use HARO.

Trust Seals

These little graphics still matter. Except for the BBB, it’s rarely worth your time to join an organization just for the credibility boost on your website (unless you have other business reasons for doing so).

But, the more you have, the better.

In terms of effectiveness, these don’t rank as highly as other techniques discussed.

But, they’re quick and easy to add to your website. And they help.

Make sure you have trust seals from all professional organizations you belong to. Except for the BBB, they can be located pretty much anywhere on your homepage (usually half to all the way down).

If you accept payments on your website, display the logos of credit cards you use – right at the moment, your customer clicks the button to pay.

Include the logos of companies or media organizations where you’ve been quoted.

And if you have recognizable customers you’ve served, use their logos also (assuming you have their permission!).

Again, these can be placed little ways down your home page. You could also create an entirely separate page for this, but make sure you integrate the most notable ones into your homepage.

Reviews and Ratings

These generally apply to e-commerce sites that sell products. But some niches (law and HVAC for example), have many sources for customer reviews and ratings.

This could include Google reviews, Avvo (for lawyers), or Angie’s List and Houzz for various contractors.

If the review discusses one of several services you offer, make sure that review appears on the specific page you created to sell that service.

Don’t just dump your reviews all on a single page, like many SMBs do. Customers do not visit those pages frequently.

Shares and Views

These can be really tough to get at the SMB level. Building a dedicated online following takes tons of hard work.

Getting decent numbers of shares on your blog posts, or views can take well over a year (and even longer). Or, building your Facebook following can take a similar amount of effort.

But, you may have a significant number of blog post views or social media shares you’re proud of.

In that case, place links to follow you on Facebook (see our Facebook advertising services) that also shows your follower count. If you have a blog, you can install widgets that show the number of views your posts have.

Social Proof Makes You Convincing

Do you need every one of these elements?

No.

But, the more you have, the better. And the newer or less recognized your business, the more they help.

If you’re an established local SMB, you still need them. While some people know and trust you, many don’t.

You don’t have instant recognition unless you’re a local celebrity.

You don’t need to dedicate all your energy to this. But at least a portion of your marketing efforts should work on building social proof over time.

The more you have, the easier it is for customers to choose you.

 

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